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Savills - Euro Travel Megatrends Report

 

Global property expert Savills has launched a report which identifies the key trends expected to drive the travel sector by 2030. Abigail Parkin

Its European Hotels Megatrends report predicts that Europe will continue to be the preferred destination for a rising number of ‘silver’ travellers from the EU, Asia and Middle East. These travellers will belie age to opt for more active and sporty getaways by 2030 - in common with younger travellers seeking the same pursuits.

The report sees single holidaymakers across all generations forming a larger share of travellers who will want to meet like-minded people. This is expected to put the onus on hotels to be more accommodating of solo  travellers. It’s partially driven by future traveller confidence in digital connectivity, giving rise to more obscure alternatives in location choice.

Social media will further fuel holidays that allow travellers to “access the inaccessible”. The report goes on to claim that with no new destinations by 2030, travellers will find creative spots that impress their social media followers. It appears that the reward will lie in the risk of uncharted destinations.

Hotel trends are forecast as including facial recognition software across venues to target business travellers, speeding up check-in. Lobbies will offer large, elaborate work/social spaces, with extended food and drink options, as hotels compete with serviced office providers. Also 3D motion technology will allow travellers real-time interaction with colleagues in “immersive” environments. Technology will personalise hotel stays with guests being greeted by their favourite film on TV and their chosen lighting levels as the hotel industry competes with home-sharing platforms.

Ecotourism is expected to rule life by 2030 but without compromising traveller comfort so hotels will need to demonstrate how they minimise their carbon footprint and use fair trade products and support local communities.

George Nicholas, global head of hotels at Savills, said: “Young travellers prioritise ‘experience’ and creating bespoke trips to maximise their leisure time, making them dubious of impersonal hotels and of following well-trodden tourist trails. Alongside this you have the already well-travelled baby boomers who are not willing to compromise on comfort or experience as they grow older. Hotels therefore will need to focus on what they can provide that is truly unique and how they can tailor and personalise their offer, be that for a 22 year old single traveller or a 65 year old couple, to continue to capture their custom in 2030.”

 

 

 

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